Miami University-Oxford

Oxford, OH, USA

Admissions

Key Admission Stats

Institution Type
Public
  • Coed

Need Blind

This school does not consider an applicant’s financial situation when deciding admission

Level of Institution
4 Year
Campus Setting
Suburb or town

0
100
68%
Acceptance Rate
30,255
Students Applied
52%
Transfer Acceptance Rate
485
Transfer Students Admitted

Admissions Requirements

SAT
Yes
ACT
Yes
SAT Subject Tests
Yes
AP Course Credit
Yes
Dual Enrollment
Yes
Transcript
Yes

Important Deadlines

Application Type Application Deadline Reply Deadline
Early Decision Acceptance is binding so student must attend college if accepted. November 1, 2020 January 15, 2020
Early Action Acceptance is not binding, but student will receive admissions decision earlier. November 1, 2020 May 1, 2020
Fall Regular Decision February 1, 2020 May 1, 2020
Spring Regular Decision December 1, 2019
Other
Early Action II Deadline
December 1, 2019 May 1, 2020
Test Optional
No
Application Fee
$50
Fee waivers available
Rolling Admissions
No

Admitted Student Stats

In-State Students
56%
Out-Of-State Students
35%
US States Represented
52
Countries Represented
102
85%
Submitting ACT
23%
Submitting SAT
Average ACT Composite: 29
0
36
Average SAT Composite: 1332
0
1600
SAT Percentiles

Math
25th
610
75th
710
Reading
25th
580
75th
670
3.80
Average GPA
Students Enrolled By GPA

3.75+
55%
3.50 - 3.74
21%
3.25 - 3.49
13%
3.00 - 3.24
7%
2.50 - 2.99
4%
Students Enrolled By Class Rank

Top 10%
34
Top 25%
66
Top 50%
92
Students Enrolled By Household Income

< $30k
139
$30k - $48k
105
$48k - $75k
153
$75k - $110k
212
$110k+
553

Admissions Resources

Admissions: visit page
Admissions Email: admission@miamioh.edu
Admissions Telephone: 513-529-2531
For International Student Services: visit page
For Students with Disabilities: visit page
For Veteran Services: visit page

What Students Are Saying

4.19 Average Rating
Thinking about going to Miami? You won't want to pass up the opportunity. The administration and staff are so kind and welcoming. If you do bring a bicycle (I have one and find it very handy) make sure to lock it securely no matter what. They are often preyed on by the bikeless. Also the food is delicious, but don't get carried away or you won't fit your pants by second semester. Get involved to meet people who are interested in the same things you are. Its a great way to do things you love and make long lasting friendships.
Jennifer from Cincinnati, OH
first and foremost - try out tons of things. get involved in activities, go to mega fair, go take classes at the rec, join clubs, go to hall events, look into studying abroad. there are endless opportunities to have an amazing college experience at miami, you just have to get involved on campus and find what you love.
courtney from fairborn, oh
1. Free time can get boring after a few weeks, there is little to do if you're not into partying.
2. Make sure you'll use your book before you buy it (often, you don't need to purchase books for the first couple of days). I've bought a few books in the past that I never needed. If you do buy it and decide you don't need it, return it within a week and you'll get a better price than you would if you waited. Also, make sure you get the correct edition.
3. Come early on move-in day, it gets hectic later in the day. Save your trip to Wal-Mart until the day after move-in because that gets very busy as well.
4. Don't forget an umbrella, rainboots, and snowboots.
5. You have to live on campus for the first 2 years, so be prepared to live in a dorm for that long. Becoming an RA (resident assistant) is a great idea for sophomores since you're there anyway, might as well make some money and the job isn't too demanding.
6. Get involved.
Samantha from Erlanger, KY
1. Bringing a bike might be a good idea as it makes going uptown or even traveling to class more manageable.
2. Get involved early on--there are numerous organizations and clubs and it is a great way to meet people.
3. Explore the beautiful and scenic Ohio landscape surrounding the campus.
4. Don't expect a lot from the town--the university is the town.
Demitrios from Chicago, IL
I would suggest that prospective students make sure they practice good study habits. Coming into college most grades are only tests and quizzes so you really have to make sure you can study correctly.
Also, I would recommend saving up as much money as possible so you have one less thing to stress about, and possibly get into an argument about with the parents. This problem can also be solved by getting an on-campus job, which I highly recommend.
Mike from Cincinnati, OH
1. Apply for the Bridges Program (it gives you some extra scholarship money)
2. Apply early (its less stressful to know earlier if you are a future Redhawk)
3. If you decide to join us, sign up for the free, early move in program. You will meet people living in your hall and its a fantastic program.
Emily from Cincinnati, OH
1. Don't wear a lanyard with your ID on it.
2. Wait until the class starts to buy books- the bookstore website doesn't always offer the right ones, you don't always need them, or you might end up dropping the class and have a totally useless book.
3. At the end of each semester, lots of people will be giving away their unused stuff or selling books for cheap. Take advantage!
4. Go to MegaFair and get involved in at least one activity. However, this isn't high school- you can't be involved in every club. Pick a couple things you love and don't worry about resume builders.
Lauryn from WI
1. When scheduling classes, don't make any assumptions or take anything for granted. Check the availability of classes. Also, the grade distributions from past semesters can be found on the Miami web site.
2. There may be times when a professor will not use a textbook at all in a course. Waiting a couple of days before buying books, or asking a professor can save you money that would otherwise be wasted on a 500 page paperweight.
3. If you have spare time, feel free to join a club. But if you don't, DON'T! There are a lot of great opportunities for networking and meeting people here at Miami, but they will be around every semester. Meeting people is inevitable. You won't have to work too hard at it. Just be friendly and keep an open mind.
4. Go to office hours if you need help. And don't be afraid to look clueless. Better now than at Finals. Sometimes you just need to say, I'm completely lost. Can you go over this again?.
5. Try to relax! Half of my problem was that I never gave my brain a chance to slow down. If you get yourself too worked up, you can have trouble sleeping or even make yourself sick. Then you'll be even more behind. It's a cycle. Break it!
Andrew from Lima, OH
My best advice is to come with as open a mind as you can. Miami gets the image of being preppy and, despite that being pretty true, you can find people you like anywhere. You know those stupid ice breakers and "fun RA-sponsored dorm activities?" Go to them. They're goofy and lame but you meet a whole lotta people. I am entering my senior year and most of my best friends are those I met my first week of college.
Jeremy from Toledo, OH
If possible, attend an overnighter. It's the best way to judge the climate of a school. Visit with teachers, department heads, etc, but more importantly, talk to students (without faculty in hearing range). Imagine yourself there. Could you sit in King Library? Would you enjoy doing your homework outside, can you see yourself standing in line for an intense hockey game?

And, always keep your education in mind. What are your goals? And what resources are available to you to achieve them.
Hannah from N Canton, OH