The College of Saint Scholastica

Duluth, MN, USA

Admissions

Key Admission Stats

Institution Type
Private
  • Coed

Need Blind

This school does not consider an applicant’s financial situation when deciding admission

Level of Institution
4 Year
Campus Setting
Small city

0
100
68%
Acceptance Rate
3,833
Students Applied
66%
Transfer Acceptance Rate
530
Transfer Students Admitted

Admissions Requirements

SAT
Yes
ACT
Yes
SAT Subject Tests
Yes
AP Course Credit
Yes
Dual Enrollment
Yes
Transcript
Yes

Important Deadlines

Rolling Admissions

The college has rolling admissions, which means applications are accepted any time throughout the year.

Test Optional
No
Applications Accepted
Rolling Admissions
Yes

Admitted Student Stats

In-State Students
81%
Out-Of-State Students
13%
US States Represented
49
Countries Represented
20
95%
Submitting ACT
5%
Submitting SAT
Average ACT Composite: 23
0
36
Average SAT Composite: 1141
0
1600
SAT Percentiles

Math
25th
510
75th
630
Reading
25th
510
75th
670
3.50
Average GPA
Students Enrolled By GPA

3.75+
35%
3.50 - 3.74
18%
3.25 - 3.49
19%
3.00 - 3.24
14%
2.50 - 2.99
11%
2.00 - 2.49
3%
Students Enrolled By Class Rank

Top 10%
17
Top 25%
47
Top 50%
79

Admissions Resources

Admissions: visit page
Admissions Email: admissions@css.edu
Admissions Telephone: 800-249-6412
For International Student Services: visit page
For Students with Disabilities: visit page
For Veteran Services: visit page

What Students Are Saying

3.85 Average Rating
Don't be worried about anything at this school they make you feel right at home. You will succeed at this school if you keep up with all your homework and study for all your test. And if you need help with any homework there is always free help for you.
Brook from Iron River, WI
Apply, Apply, Apply! Apply to St. Scholastica, attend a tour and try to stay overnight! The longer you are on campus the more you'll fall in love with the history behind this 100 year old school. We still have nuns on campus reminding us of where we began and they continue to build new facilities to attend to the growing population of students attending classes.
Samantha from Bloomington, MN
Throughout the year I heard of a few horror stories from other freshman pertaining to their experiences at Saint Scholastica as well as the University of Minnesota Duluth. Almost every case has to do with newly met peers from the dorms or the lounges. Because the freshman population is very small there is a guaranteed chance of encountering the same people on a weekly bases. The best way to deal with unfavorable relationships, in my opinion, is to join clubs, groups and other organizations on campus to meet students with similar interests. These organizations will bring you into a pool of people from freshman to seniors as well.
Straying away from social matters I will now bring up a point that may save you a great amount of cash: be conservative on how you buy books! Most students will buy the brand new versions of the textbook required for class costing them an average of over $100. Be smarter than them and look for either an older edition or an international edition. Why these? They have the same content, or slightly altered content to what is in the latest version. The international edition is not for sale in bookstores and must be purchased online because it is technically not legal for sale within the united states; therefore, do so at your own risk (which is hardly even worth calling a risk)
If you're planning on majoring in any health science related field (nursing, PT, Exercise Phys) I suggest that you fulfill classes that will help you with entrance into a medical school. This keeps your options open and hardly increases scheduling difficulties.
Last, but not least, take summer classes! These classes are about a third of the fall and spring credit costs and can help you take any extra classes you might want (ex. pre-reqs for med school).
Ruslan from Finland, MN
Although having brains in the first place is a very important thing, Saint Scholastica is a fantastic school at helping you along even if you aren't a genius. All of the teachers I have had so far are willing to help you in their office hours or scheduled meetings, class sizes are small so you can ask questions if you want. It's a really great learning environment for all types of learners and all levels.
Ayla from Shoreview, MN
make sure to have a general idea of what interests you to help the advisors pick the best classes for you. it's an expensive college, so choose your major wisely. don't be afraid to ask questions, faculty and staff are very willing to help.
Meredith from Orr, MN
A couple tips for perspective students...I would say that no matter what meal plan you get, you use at least one meal a day in Storm's Den (one of the cafeterias). Another tip is to pick classes that you think you'll enjoy and will also fulfill your general requirements. Also remember that college is supposed to be fun, so try and take a couple fun courses or make a study group for a harder course and make it fun.
Krystal from Scandia, MN
Get involved right away is some club or activity. Go to the writing center they can really help you out with anything involving writing. Get to know your professors you will be surprised on how willing they are to help you succeed.
Emily from Duluth, MN
Definitely look over your financial situation thoroughly, make sure you want to commit to this high of a payment to be at CSS. Without a doubt, I say it is worth it. But its still very important to consider options and apply for scholarships.
Kasey from Rosemount, MN
During my first year of college, I was told to try everything once, discover what I like to do, and to meet everyone I can. I took this tips to heart and have met many, many good friends and now know what I want to do for the rest of my life because I took risks during college and let down my guard. So, my tips to prospective college students would be to not get so wrapped up in what you want to major in, but instead, focus on what you love to do. If you figure this out, then I assure you that your major will fall into place. My motto is that if you are paying for education, don't waste it on partying, or taking classes in a major that isn't something that you want to do for the rest of your life. I am majoring in Occupational Therapy; even though I have to go to grad school for two years, I know it will be worth it because that is what I am passionate about.
Rachel from Duluth, MN
Stay on top of classes! Get involved with activities. Lots of on campus jobs for you to get.
Sean - Buffalo, MN