University of California-Los Angeles
Los Angeles, CA, USA

Admissions

Key Admission Stats

Institution Type
Public
  • Coed

Need Blind

This school does not consider an applicant’s financial situation when deciding admission

Level of Institution
4 Year
Campus Setting
Major city
0
100
16%
Acceptance Rate
102,225
Students Applied
24%
Transfer Acceptance Rate
5770
Transfer Students Admitted

Admissions Requirements

SAT
No
ACT
No
SAT Subject Tests
No
AP Course Credit
Yes
Dual Enrollment
Yes
Transcript
Yes

Important Deadlines

Application Type Application Deadline Reply Deadline
Fall Regular Decision November 30, 2019
Test Optional
Yes
Application Fee
$70
Fee waivers available
Applications Accepted
Rolling Admissions
No

Admitted Student Stats

In-State Students
88%
Out-Of-State Students
13%
US States Represented
50
Countries Represented
100
62%
Submitting ACT
76%
Submitting SAT
Average ACT Composite: 32
0
36
Average SAT Composite: 1387
0
1600
SAT Percentiles

Math
25th
600
75th
740
Reading
25th
620
75th
710
3.90
Average GPA
Students Enrolled By GPA

3.75+
86%
3.50 - 3.74
10%
3.25 - 3.49
3%
3.00 - 3.24
1%
Students Enrolled By Class Rank

Top 10%
97
Top 25%
100
Top 50%
100
Students Enrolled By Household Income

< $30k
943
$30k - $48k
518
$48k - $75k
479
$75k - $110k
303
$110k+
482

Admissions Resources

Admissions: visit page
Admissions Email: [email protected]
Admissions Telephone: 310-825-3101
For International Student Services: visit page
For Students with Disabilities: visit page
For Veteran Services: visit page

What Students Are Saying

4.25 Average Rating
STUDY! Study, study! Make your own outlines on all the reading you do, you are your own teacher. Professors do not give hand- outs, review sheets, homework, etc. YOU do. But then you learn so much if you do these things and develop great work ethic.
Elizabeth from San Pedro, CA
Start on your application early! Make sure you spell check it and have others read your personal essay. Also, come visit campus and take a tour!
Gina from Modesto, CA
- Apply for every type of financial aid, especially if you feel that you won't get any. You never know how many other students feel the same way, and your persistence will show.
- Take advantage of your professors' wisdom. Ask them questions and visit them during their office hours whenever you can.
- Meet a lot of people. Just talk to everyone you meet. Meet their friends. Networking is SOOO important, and you never know who could help you out in the future.
- Get involved with some type of community service. Not only does this look great on a resume, but you also learn a lot about human nature and about yourself through it.
- Make a schedule and stick to it. This will really prove your discipline.
- Form good habits. It takes 21 days to form a habit, and it's always hardest at the beginning, but if you can stick it out, the rewards will definitely outweigh the hardships you went through.
- Study every night. This is the biggest difference between high school and college. You are your own boss. Make sure you spend a large amount of your free time refreshing yourself on that morning's lecture. Even if you don't have homework, the information will start to pile up, so it's good to use that free time at the beginning to ensure you know the course information as best you can.
- This is especially for the girls: take it easy in the dining halls. Be sure to eat slowly and get one plate at a time. GO TRAYLESS! Even though you think you're getting enough exercise going up that hill every day, a couple slices of pizza and a few burgers can add up to the freshman 15.
Joanna from Carson City, NV
Go to class -- except maybe not discussions. But definitely give your discussions a few tries before you stop attending (and definitely attend if attendance is mandatory). I had one TA who gave us huge (HUGE) homework hints which actually annoyed me, because I kind of thought the homework was... I can't believe I'm saying this... fun. But it would have been helpful if I had been struggling.
Give professors a chance. I had one professor who didn't seem like the greatest teacher at first, but as soon I got used to his teaching style I realized that he is actually an amazing, nice, and funny teacher. He's become on of my favorite teachers, and his classes ( I took two) one of the deciding factors in determining my major.
Choose your meal plan wisely. Are you going to eat out a lot? Are you going to go home? Are you really going to get up and go to the dining hall before 9 for breakfast if you don't have class? If you do have class? (note: there are to-go places open until about 11 for breakfast ) Somehow, there are people who end up with more than 20 meals swipes left at the end of the quarter-- I don't know about you, but my parents would not pleased.
Kate
#1 is to take high school seriously and get good grades. For extracurriculars, do not swamp yourself with tons of things. Choose a few that you really enjoy, and try to gain leadership experience. As for the application, use your essays to portray who you are. If you are true to yourself and to admissions, they will respond well to your application and understand if you are a right fit for the college. As long as you are truthful to yourself, you will end up at a college that fits your needs and interests. Good luck!
Jessica
Have Fun. Don't bite more than what you can chew: schedule wise. Freshman fifteen does not happen to everyone, but if you're not careful it will happen to you. Stay on top of your homework because sometimes you'll have midterms in 3rd week!!!
Jazmin from Los Angeles, CA
Apply for external scholarships aplenty! Your chances of getting awarded from the financial aid office are pretty low since there are a lot of students enrolled.

It also helps if you already have good study habits established. I didn't establish them until the end of my first year, and it's reflected in my GPA. It's best if you can study the material throughout the quarter and spend the time before the tests reviewing. The best students aren't the ones that memorize the most, but the ones that can draw connections between the concepts they learn in class and use these connections to recall the facts they need to know.
Stephen from San Diego, CA
Succeeding at UCLA is all about balance. There are so many activities and things going on 24/7 that you have to really focus on being organized and getting done everything you need to. This means finding time to study, explore the incredible variety of activities UCLA has to offer, and enjoy the once-in-a-lifetime social opportunities college affords. Classes are tough, and it’s important to realize that it’s not like high school – it’s ok to get a B. Almost everyone does. With this in mind, it’s important to not get too overwhelmed with school. Don’t forget to take time to relax and have fun. Get outside and enjoy that California sunshine. And last but certainly not least, DO NOT PROCRASTINATE. If you slack off for a week on the quarter system, you will literally never catch up.
Liz
Don't be afraid to shake your tail feathers weather they be blue, green, spotted, or striped, or if you don't even have any! No one will judge you at UCLA. There's a group, a club for nearly everything. Be true to who you are and at UCLA you will found out more of who you are.
Katie
You need to come prepared to work at a faster pace than high school. You need to learn to manage your time wisely. Procrastination will be your enemy so you must force yourself to keep up with all your classes and the work that it demands. You must always study even when you think that you don't need to and always get help when you are confused.
JOANNA from Fullerton, CA