University of Connecticut
CT, USA

Admissions

Key Admission Stats

Institution Type
Public
  • Coed

Need Aware

This school may consider an applicant’s financial situation when deciding admission

Level of Institution
4 Year
Campus Setting
Suburb or town
0
100
49%
Acceptance Rate
34,886
Students Applied
61%
Transfer Acceptance Rate
764
Transfer Students Admitted

Admissions Requirements

SAT
Yes
ACT
Yes
SAT Subject Tests
Yes
AP Course Credit
Yes
Dual Enrollment
Yes
Transcript
Yes

Important Deadlines

Application Type Application Deadline Reply Deadline
Fall Regular Decision January 15, 2021 May 1, 2020
Other
Priority Application for merit aid and special programs.
December 1, 2019 May 1, 2020
Test Optional
Yes
Application Fee
$80
Fee waivers available
Rolling Admissions
No

Admitted Student Stats

In-State Students
66%
Out-Of-State Students
21%
US States Represented
43
Countries Represented
79
24%
Submitting ACT
87%
Submitting SAT
Average ACT Composite: 30
0
36
Average SAT Composite: 1318
0
1600
SAT Percentiles

Math
25th
610
75th
730
Reading
25th
600
75th
690
3.80
Average GPA
Students Enrolled By Class Rank

Top 10%
50
Top 25%
84
Top 50%
98
Students Enrolled By Household Income

< $30k
241
$30k - $48k
169
$48k - $75k
215
$75k - $110k
239
$110k+
579

Admissions Resources

Admissions: visit page
Admissions Email: [email protected]
Admissions Telephone: 860-468-3137
For International Student Services: visit page
For Students with Disabilities: visit page
For Veteran Services: visit page

What Students Are Saying

3.92 Average Rating
UConn is a large school with many opportunities. Though you might not know what type of college experience you are looking for, giving UConn a shot is definitely a good idea. As a student planning to transfer to a smaller school, I honestly do not regretting giving UConn a chance, due to the experience I have obtained and knowledge of what I do and do not like about certain schools. You won't know until you try it!
Jamie from Milford, CT
Space saving tips are relevant to every college, including UConn. Bring storage bins and the things you really need. You can bring a few novelties, like your own edition of Apples to Apples, a Johnathon the Husky doll, or body paint for those really intense sports games. But there's only so much room in every dorm room, especially if you're a freshman. (If you're going to be living in Buckley, you'll have a few more square feet to stretch your toes in; go ahead and bring your favorite larping boffer). On average, the dorms are about 11'x14' for two people. Each person gets their own desk, chair, dresser, and closet.

But here's the wisdom I really want to impart to the next generation: Be ready for the weather. In the summer, the heat is nigh intolerable. Students will flock en masse to anywhere that has air conditioning (for example, I've seen kids sleeping in study lounges instead of their own rooms). I would recommend bringing a window fan. Because of this nifty device, my room was perhaps the coolest on the floor.

The summer quickly chills to a nippy autumn. Definitely bring layers to wear. During this time of year, the day can be really warm. But as soon as the sun drops below the horizon, the temperature takes a nose dive. Bring rain boots for the rain, but I caution you on the use of umbrellas. Unless you want to invest in a really good one, don't bother. Storrs is a wind tunnel; it will destroy any cheap umbrella you try to force against its destructive power. Keep the weather in mind as you pack your bags for Storrs. It can change in an instant, so make sure you're prepared for anything. Anything.
Alyssa from Orange, CT
Get involved! There are literally hundreds of programs and clubs that will make your time here even more enjoyable. Put yourself out there as well. College is the time to meet new people and experience new things, some might be outside of your comfort zone but all of them will helo you grow and develop as a college student.
Luke from Glastonbury, CT
Get INVOLVED! It might make the difference between loving the school and hating it.
Lilia from Willington, CT
Well the first tip could really apply to any school and is really cliche(you have probably read it in a ton of articles already) but you have to GET OUT THERE! Don't sit around waiting for the college experience to come to you, you have to go get it. Talk to as many people as you can, try different clubs that you wouldn't normally try, play intramural sports if that's your thing. Do whatever you can to get involved and to make college all it should be. Second tip is definitely bring clothes for all types of weather. The weather here can be weird and the first semester starts out really hot, but by the time winter break comes it gets very cold.
Matthew from Waterbury, CT
Personally, being in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows me to be flexible in what classes I take. I can switch majors depending on what classes I have taken and not have to worry about wasting my time taking a certain class not within my major. Don't expect UConn to be a party school where your parents will foot the bill, since the university has established many programs for serious students who want careers in business, healthcare and medicine, pharmacy, engineering, and the fine arts. The other colleges that make up UConn as a whole (School of Business, Nursing, Pharmacy, etc.) also have their own specific programs and study plans, so whatever major you're planning on going into, there will be advisers and student mentors who are there to help you and provide motivation and support for those times when you feel overwhelmed.
M from Storrs, CT
I definitely would not apply here before touring. It's an awesome school but it's definitely not right for everyone and you can tell a lot about the school from the tour.
Sarah from West Hartford, CT
Do well on your SATs! Your scores are super important when applying. I also recommended taking a tour and coming to the open house. Big schools aren't for everyone, so check it out before you commit.
Stephanie from Ashburnham, MA
Uconn is a big school, and potentially intimidating for an incoming freshman. I would request an all freshman dorm. It will help you to make a tight-knit friend group right off the bat. If scope out your own little niche, the transition from your high school to this large university won't be so jarring.
Abigail from Cheshire, CT
If you don't like the cold, don't come here.
TF from Norwich, CT

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