University of Washington-Seattle Campus
Seattle, WA, USA

Reviews

University of Washington-Seattle Campus
3.91 Average Rating

Madeline from Seattle, WA

a current student here
87 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
Am learning a lot
If you can get past the large number of students in your lower-level classes, learning will not be a problem. Professors, TAs and study centers are generally very kind and willing to help you out. If you seek help, you will get it.
Am enjoying being here
So many fun things to do on and off campus! Downtown Seattle is a short bus ride away.
Bang for the buck
Freshman don't usually get much (if anything) in the way of scholarships. If you're set on the University of Washington, look for outside scholarships to cover your first year or two, and remember that once you've declared a major, departmental scholarships will start coming your way.
Tips for prospective students
Becoming involved in the multitudes of extracurricular activities offered is the single most important thing you can do as a student at the University of Washington. This is a very, very large school and it's important to find a smaller group to call home.
Great for these types of students
Students who don't mind lots of rain and lots of (smart) people will love the University of Washington!
Sign in to rate & review

Laura from Seattle, WA

a current student here
70 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
Am learning a lot
I have learned more at this University than any of my past educational institutions. There is so much information and knowledge condensed into each class, it's sometimes mind blowing. Every class seems interesting, so you'll never be left without options.
Am enjoying being here
I love living in Seattle. It is a relaxed, beautiful city. There hasn't been as much rain as I expected, mostly overcast, which I do not mind (plus, if you really need the rays, you can go and sit under some UV lamps in the Hall Health center to boost your vitamin D intake and nurture a happy disposition if need be.) There are so many places and sights to experiences - there's never a dull moment here.
Bang for the buck
I am currently paying in-state tuition, averaged at $7,692 for a typical undergraduate (compared to the $24,367 for non-residents of Washington). I feel that this is an adequate price to pay for the quality of education, awesome college experience, and prestige associated with this university.

The food on campus is mostly a bit overpriced. But it is the price you pay for its convenience. You can always eat off-campus. Seattle is deliciously diverse, but budgeting will become very important to you.

The housing... I am slightly indifferent about because it is situational. There are three paths: off-campus (with parents, own apartment, etc.), on-campus (dorms), or Greek (fraternity or sorority). Each of these has their own set of variables that can contribute to your happiness or frustration of your living situation. I have friends in all places so if you would really like to know more, feel free to send me an e-mail. I love to procrastinate my homework: [email protected]
Tips for prospective students
Due to economic pressures this year, the state budget for our school's funding has unfortunately dropped and many of this year's students are planning more for our financial future at this school (my primary reason for coming to Cappex). My first piece of advice would be to get as much financial aid as possible even before the school has issued aid to you. In college, you can NEVER have too much money. I did not apply for any because I thought it was one big lottery game that I was never going to win, but I have learned it never hurts to try.

Secondly, be prepared to read and write like never before. Also, be prepared to actively read (underline, highlight, whatever floats your boat) and take good notes.

Thirdly, the taking good notes tip also applies to lectures, which you should go to. Even if they are Pod-Casted or on the internet because chances are you will procrastinate listening to them. Figure out a note-taking structure that you can best review when it comes down to studying.

Lastly, figure out your ideal study space. Ask yourself, do you need silence? Do you need lots of space? Do you need to be super comfortable? There are many libraries, buildings, grassy wet knolls, and other atmospheres to surround yourself in when you need to get down to business. Guaranteed, there will be a place for you, and it will be quite rewarding when you find it.
Great for these types of students
The University of Washington is great for students with independent personalities, and for those, with perseverance, who want to become more independent in their academic and personal lives. This school does not hand-hold you by any means. You are responsible for figuring out how to get that extra financial aid, what classes to register for, and how to manage your schedule. Granted, there are many knowledgeable outlets for help and guidance (Mary Gates Undergraduate Advising, Departmental Advisers, Husky Mentors program to name a few), but an education at this school mainly consists of you alone actively pursuing your goals. This definitely fosters good leadership skills.
Sign in to rate & review

Alexandra from WA

a current student here
27 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
In three sentences
University of Washington is a school with very strong academics and different options on campus. There's a big culture of discovery, of debate, and of moving into the future. It's a rainy, rustic campus with a lot to offer to students.
Tips for prospective students
If you learned a language in high school, take language placement tests at UW as soon as possible. Almost every major has a language requirement that you can test out of, and it's a pain to try to deal with that when you're three years into college and you've forgotten almost everything.
--
Plan to live on campus or as close as possible. It's very difficult to be involved in extracurriculars, study groups, or social events if you live more than 15 minutes away from campus.
Academic Rigor
Most classes are fairly difficult. Introductory STEM classes tend to be some of the worst, especially elimination classes-- basically, these classes try to reduce the number of students eligible for certain majors by giving everyone a high workload and difficult tests so that only a few can succeed and move into the major. Do not take computer science classes for general education requirements-- the first few are notoriously difficult because computer science is a very competitive major. Classes with a lot of pre-med students tend to have steep curves, so if you can manage it, it's good to take biology and chemistry classes out of sync (for instance, taking the first in a series in the winter instead of the fall) because pre-med students have to take classes in sync to finish them all in time. Social science classes are heavily conceptual. In general, non-STEM teachers are more willing to accommodate students and alter the syllabus if a large chunk of the class doesn't seem to understand something.
Dorm Life
I do not live on campus. My commute is about 12 miles, which takes between an hour and two hours, depending on the time of day. This makes it difficult to participate in a lot of on-campus activities, which are often late into the evening and night. I would not recommend this to anyone who absolutely does not have to do it.
--
From what I have heard, dorms are generally pretty good. A lot of people live in apartments close to campus instead of at UW dorms, which is sometimes less expensive but significantly more effort to coordinate.
Food and Dining
There are vending machines with snack food (chips, pretzels, candy, and sometimes fruit snacks) in almost every building. About a third of buildings have a small cafes, where you can purchase coffee and the same few healthy food options. The HUB has several food options, such as pizza, pasta, diner-style food (like chicken strips and burgers), and a few different Asian food options.
--
About a block from UW is a street known as the Ave which has dozens of small shops and restaurants. They vary from cafes to brewpubs to Thai restaurants. Each seats about 30-40 people. By bus, there is access to University Village (with larger restaurants) and downtown Seattle (with more expensive upscale restaurants).
Great for these types of students
For science subjects, UW is great for highly motivated students with good academic skills. UW's medical school is one of the best. UW funds the most undergraduate research of any public university, so if you are interested in doing scientific research UW might be a good school for you.
--
For social science, UW is great for students interested in tough concepts and lots of struggling with contemporary issues (as opposed to a high emphasis on which scholars said what). Social science classes (and the student body in general) tend to have a liberal/left perspective but there's a strong culture of debate and considering different ideas.
--
The terrain is supposed to be accessible, but it's often uneven, difficult to navigate, and it's slippery when it rains. If you have difficulty walking, tend to slip, and/or walk with a cane, you may have some trouble getting around campus. Elevators are often broken in certain buildings. So UW isn't always the greatest campus for students with physical disabilities-- mountain climbers, however, would be right at home.
Clubs and Activities
There are a lot of clubs and organizations on campus. Almost all of them meet in the evening or at night, after all classes are done for the day. If you can make it to the meetings, there's something for almost everyone.
Sign in to rate & review

Jessica from Seattle, WA

a current student here
20 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
Am learning a lot
Paying attention in class is very important - I notice a lot of students get away with surfing Facebook or MSN in class because undergrad classes are so large. If you take notes and use the wealth of knowledge that your TA's have, you'll do well.
Am enjoying being here
The Ave is fun and has quite the selection of 'ethnic food', you can go almost anywhere in Seattle by bus, and the people are nice.
Bang for the buck
Tuition is going up this fall of 2009, and up again in 2010. Times are tight, so there's a definite sense that the increase in tuition coupled with the decrease in professors is a bit of a jip for the students.
Tips for prospective students
Be prepared to lose weight when you start school: you walk a LOT on campus. UW's Seattle campus is also on a hill, so you go downhill to get anywhere and have to work to get back. Also prepare for rain, and don't take the higher food plans from the college. Buy your food from the local grocery stores or restaurants, which are fairly inexpensive.
Great for these types of students
City slickers, those who like large colleges, those who want to major in the sciences, anyone who LOVES ethnic food, people who love soccer and want to attend college in the city with the best MLS soccer team in the US
Sign in to rate & review

Janella from Everett, WA

a current student here
18 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
Am learning a lot
I was afraid that I'd come to the University not knowing anything, desperately trying hard to keep up with the curriculum. It turns out that the UW isn't so scary. Yes, it is a challenge, but it's a great experience that's easily overcome with growing up and taking responsibility of your studying habits.

There are so many resources here. You can pretty much get help with ANYTHING! All you have to do is ask. Something I've been told several times is that the everyone here wants you to succeed. You've got office hours to talk to your professors (asking for help or just to talk), TA's, study centers designed for specific classes and subjects, online forums for individual classes, even study buddy systems in dorms.

Not only can you get help on any subject, but there's so many resources to help find yourself, what major might fit you, internships, careers you might want to consider, etc.

The diversity on campus is also a great source of learning. Just making friends help you explore yourself and learn about worlds you’re not familiar with.

Yeah, there can be some huge lecture classes, but you get separated into smaller classes within most classes where you can ask any questions you have. So it's almost like watching a video in a movie theatre and then being able to talk about it in a class of 20-30 people.

College is about learning as much as you can about yourself and the world in which you want to live in (let it be science, technology, art, history, etc). The University of Washington helps you do all of that. You just have to ask.
Am enjoying being here
I love the UW. The diversity, the range of clubs, the many resources, the architecture, fun professors, the student activity, the restaurants and cafés on campus, the U-Village for nearby shopping, being just a bus ride away from downtown Seattle and many other popular locations (many buses go right through campus), the quad during spring, the history of the school, the Harry Potter reading room... the list goes on.

Yes, it rains a lot... but it's always fun to be able to use rain boots or hear the rain fall on your umbrella. It doesn't rain every single day. The sunny days during school are just right; not scolding hot, maybe 55-70 degrees.

Aside from weather, the UW has that scholarly feel. Even though you're having a tough time in class, you feel smart just being there, and you know that you're getting a good education.
Bang for the buck
Yeah, it's pretty pricey. But what I've been advised is that it doesn't matter what you're paying, it's with what you do with your time in college, no matter what college you go to. If you're on campus and you feel right, do it. You won't regret it.

The UW is ranked pretty high as a college and I know that there are great people here ready to help you learn what you need and want to know.
Tips for prospective students
You're going into college. YOU are responsible for making it the best years of your life. Everything is here, just ask for it.

I know it's a given, but honestly, to succeed in your classes you just simply have to do your work. I've changed my attitude to simply Just do it. It's hard sometimes (and sometimes I fall short), but doing SOMETHING is better than nothing. Often times, late work is not accepted or else you really get a low grade. Just do it.

Don't just skip class because you don't want to go. If you're really tired, just sit in the back of class and TRY to stay awake. Believe me, I KNOW it's hard.

Figure out a schedule that works for you. Manage time for studying, eating, sleeping, relaxing, and having fun.

Umbrella. Need I say more?

And something I struggled with was figuring out the systems of the school. Signing up for a FIG entering the UW was probably the best decision I've ever made. I can go on and on about how it helped me transition into college (easy making friends, help on common classes and interests, insight into what the college offers, clubs, studying abroad, etc.)

Read the back section of the planner they give you. I made some mistakes and missed opportunities by not reading my planner. It helps so much. Just read it and it'll make your life a lot easier.

Research classes (find the rating of professors and classes on your school account) before registration.

Don't sweat or stress. There's a lot of fun things, groups, and activities to get involved with. Keep it in your head that college is supposed to be the best years of your life. It's what you make it.

Just be proactive.
Great for these types of students
People who...

- like the urban (or even suburban) feel. Seattle is like my small scale NYC. But there are neighborhoods surrounding campus, so you're not smack dab in the middle of bustling streets.
- don't mind getting wet every once in a while.
- appreciates a bit of gothic architecture.
- love to learn and likes a challenge
- are social or who want to be more social
- to wear purple... you're gonna love it here!
Sign in to rate & review

Ronald from Honolulu, HI

a current student here
15 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
In three sentences
The University of Washington is a challenging school that blossoms independence and creativity. The majority of all faculty members are enthusiastic about the subject they teach, and are willing to assist all students. This school provides excellent opportunities for students who want to grow, not only academically, but socially as well.
Tips for prospective students
1) Never believe that high school is the same as college because immaturity may lead to regrettable mistakes.
2) Try hard, but don't try too hard. The key to making sure excessive effort isn't necessary is to stay on top of all assignments so that there isn't an ample amount of cramming.
3) They say that college may be too different from high school. Take this with a grain of salt because people adapt and grow into their environment differently. So don't let the horror stories and intimidation scare you.
Academic Rigor
I come from Hawaii, and we are used to having our 4.0 range from ninety percent and above. Normally, getting straight A's in Hawaii is fairly simple. However, the UW counts every last percentage towards your GPA, with 95% being the lowest for a 4.0.
Dorm Life
Like anywhere else, dorm life can be good or bad because it depends mainly on the people around you. At the UW, there is a large amount of diversity among the students, so there are many opportunities to meet people of different backgrounds and make friends.
Food and Dining
The cafeterias in the school focus on providing students with a large array of different foods to prevent students from growing tired of eating in school. However, eating in the cafeteria all of the time may cause students to seek changes in their eating environment. The UW is similar to a small city, so there are many other restaurants that sell cuisines from a cornucopia of cultures.
What to do for fun
The UW dorms provide students with access to many activities like ping pong, billiards, and video games in recreational areas. The gym, known as the IMA, is open to all students throughout the week. Especially when spring approaches, the UW campus is filled with beautiful greenery and flowers, so hanging out with friends on campus is an alternative to going to the mall.
Bang for the buck
As an out of state student, the University of Washington provides me with the education I need for a price that is worth it. There are also opportunities that students can use to save large amounts of money on purchasing anything, from food to clothes.
Share any unusual traditions or locations on campus
Every year, the UW kicks off the year by celebrating Dawg Dayz. This event is held for students who want to end their summer break by going to an enormous party for the sole purpose of having fun before school starts. On campus, The Quad is known for its famous cherry blossom trees that bloom during the spring, attracting hundreds of tourists.
Great for these types of students
All students who wish to have fun, but also academically challenge themselves.
Clubs and Activities
There are clubs that satisfy the needs of just about any student interested in any trend - Zombies vs Humans, Vampire Cosplay, Anime, and more. There are also large events for ethnic cultures, such as the Hawaiian Luau (a traditional Hawaiian celebration) that is held every year at the UW.
Greek Life
There are many fraternities and sororities that exist at the UW. Each has its own goals and requirements. The stereotypical frat boy that does poorly in school may not be seen because there are minimum GPA requirements to join certain fraternities or sororities. Nevertheless, Greek Life at the UW allows students with common interests to develop relationships and have fun.
Campus Safety
Keep in mind that the UW is a public campus, which means that although non-students cannot enter the buildings, they can still loiter around campus. This makes going out alone at night particularly dangerous.
Sign in to rate & review

Sofia

a current student here
12 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
In three sentences
Excellent balance between academics, rigor, activities, opportunities, and social life. With such a large school, finding your niche becomes easy. While the size can be daunting, the school provides access to clubs and societies to make UW feel like home.
Tips for prospective students
Involve yourself in anything, and if you hate it choose something else. Work hard on all your activities, and have goals for each year and each quarter. Dorm your first year if you can, and try to meet your roommates before school starts.
Academic Rigor
Don't expect to get a 4.0- but if you work hard a good GPA is completely plausible.
Dorm Life
Your dorm could be your friend base, but it also be a place to sleep. You make that experience what you want it to be.
Food and Dining
The options are great. It's super expensive but you have a mandatory meal plan as a first year so it doesn't really matter (don't get above a Level 1, you really have enough money with that-especially if you eat out at all or go home regularly).
What to do for fun
There's an entire city ready to be explored just one bus away.
Great for these types of students
Outgoing, ready to make the most of their education. It's easy to get lost at UW with the abundance of opportunities. At times these can be overwhelming, but a pro-active student will shine through. You can chose to stay in the shadows, but making the most of your education will prove more valuable if you go out of your way to get involved.
Clubs and Activities
There's literally hundreds of clubs, so any interest you might have has a support group ready for you to join.
Campus Safety
There's an amplitude of resources available, including people to walk with you at night, a shuttle to go across campus, and several places for emergency help.
Sign in to rate & review

Caitlin from Cincinnati, OH

a current student here
10 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
Am learning a lot
I am only a part-time student right now (I'm trying to establish residency) but I can tell that I have still grown a lot academically by taking just one class, my Honors class. The discussions that we engage in are so thought-provoking; I always leave class with my mind going 100 miles an hour! There are also so many opportunities to learn outside the classroom, such as student organizations or guest lecturers.
Am enjoying being here
Seattle is beautiful! Even though it sometimes (okay, more than sometimes) rains, the city is still gorgeous. On nice days (yes, we have those too!) you can see Mt. Rainier, the Cascades, and the Olympic Mountains. Lake Union, Lake Washington, and Puget Sound are all very accessible as well. There are tons of buses that run all over the city, so getting around is no problem at all. There's definitely always something to do!
Bang for the buck
UW statistically is one of the best values for an education. It's one of the top research institutions in America, it offers unrivaled study abroad opportunities, and has a world-class faculty. All that for less than $8,000 a year in tuition!
Tips for prospective students
Don't be afraid of how big the campus is! There are so many ways to get involved and meet people. The Honors program is one of those ways--it makes the campus a whole lot smaller. You attend Honors classes with most of the same people and can even live with them. It's a great opportunity that definitely should be considered.
Great for these types of students
Anyone can find their niche here. With 40,000 undergraduate students, it would be hard not to!
Sign in to rate & review

Shelby from Everett, WA

a current student here
9 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
Am learning a lot
I took a drama class because I needed a VLPA and I thought it would be a breeze. It wasn't exactly as easy as I predicted: I performed monologues and scenes in front of my quiz section as well as in front of my lecture. It was nerve-wracking; I was tense before class; I ended up loving the class. It let me focus energy on something other than a paper or an in-class exam and then release it in a controlled whoosh in front of people who were just as nervous and busy as I was. Not only did I have a blast being challenged in an area outside of my once puny comfort zone, but now I can give presentations about early childhood education as well as talk openly with professors in conferences no sweat. Well, let's be honest, there was a little sweat, but much less than before.

So, yes, I am learning a lot in class, but the University of Washington offers much more outside of class. I came from a smallish town in Washington and had only been to Seattle a few times before I started school at the UW, so when I did start school, the UW forced me to take the bus (something which was both daunting and extremely foreign to me). Now I am not so scared to try to take the subway in NYC.
Am enjoying being here
Totally. The campus is BEAUTIFUL. I've visited several campuses before accepting the UW's offer of enrollment, and none of them compared to the UW's campus. The quad erupts in fluffy pink cherry blossoms in the Spring, which makes studying a little easier as I can plop down beneath a gnarled cherry tree instead of staying inside. The grass is always green. In the Autumn, the sky is so blue, it's almost ridiculous.

The campus is also big enough that I can wander around if I have an hour to spare and find something I've never seen before, but small enough that it only takes ten minutes to walk from one end of it to the other.

It was a little scary at first coming to such a large school (27,000 undergrads, I think), but it's really accessible. Tutoring sessions are advertised all over the place, the class sizes range from 700 to 15 students (it's really easy to take nap in the biggest lecture room in Kane Hall and it's really easy to pick a spot up front and stay awake). The school's big, but with a little effort, your community can be as small or large as you wish.
Bang for the buck
UW offers so many loans and scholarships, that even if you're coming from out of state, tuition is totally doable. And if you need some help finding scholarships and other kinds of tuition/housing financing, drop by Schmitz or Mary Gates Hall room 120 where you can find people who are paid you help you out and are happy to do it.
Tips for prospective students
Visit the school. Learn about the UW's offered majors and minors. My friend is studying medicine and UW doesn't have pre-med, so she's majoring in Art and still taking pre-med classes. You don't have to know exactly what you want to do, but try to figure out a few areas you're interested in and ask a UW advisor about classes offered that relate.

Also: learn to love Pho, boba, and music and coffee snobs.

Oh! and it's NOT Pike's Place Market. It's Pike Place Market. It's not a market that belongs to some dude called Pike.

Oh! Oh! :) There's more to Seattle than the UW campus, which is of course wonderful and busy, but there's more. There's also more to Seattle than the Space Needle (which is not the tallest thing in Seattle) and Pike Place. Before the first quarter of your first year, grab your roommate or best friend and bus around. Go to Georgetown and get a slice of Stellar Pizza. Go to the Seattle Art Museum the first Thursday of the month for free admission. Wander through the very large Goodwill on Rainier for cool junk and then get some dim sum. Chances are, you're still a teen. If you are, register for Teen Tix. You'll get way cheaper tickets to things from movies to ballet to museums to plays. I saw a Seattle Rep production for $10 when all the old people had to see it for more than $40.
Great for these types of students
Students who love culture (you'll see once you get here).
Students who love music (awesome records stores all over the place, awesome rock scene, awesome hip hop scene).
Students who love coffee (not Starbucks. Victrola. Fuel. University Zoka, this place is awesome for studying).
Students who love reading (Elliott Bay Book Store, the Seattle Public Library).
Students who love people ('cause there are quite a few).
Students who love learning.
Sign in to rate & review

Daniel from Ridgefield, WA

a current student here
8 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
In three sentences
Amazing campus and beautiful buildings and people. The students are very diverse and all of them talented. With 40,000 or so students, you are sure to find friends whether you look for them or not.
Tips for prospective students
Meet the Washington State CADR's
Do more than the minimum
Somehow amaze people. Being a 4.0 student is good, but being a student who runs her own homeless shelter is better. Have achievements and interests outside of school, because it will help you succeed in school.
Academic Rigor
All of the classes expect you to learn so much more than the lecture will teach you. While all the professors and TAs will help you if you seek them out and want to learn, no one will spoon feed you if you don't put in any effort.
Dorm Life
Earplugs are a necessity if you plan on sleeping before 12. While many students do go to sleep earlier, even a few students being loud will keep an entire 1/4 floor awake.
Food and Dining
Food is expensive in the city. Seattle prices will get you whether you live on or off campus, but the food is great. While it is spendy, it is also good quality and there are a wide variety of different dining options for all students. You can eat in a legit restaurant that seats and serves you, or get food from a food cart and everything in between, all payable by Husky card.
What to do for fun
There are many Registered Student Organizations and if you somehow can't find one that you love, it is easy to make one. The campus is huge and full of sports fields and places to exercise. There are makerspaces and metal shops, video game and ping pong tournaments, a bowling alley and biking, plenty of parties in Greek row and a whole city to explore if that isn't enough.
Bang for the buck
You should be going here with some sort of scholarship from the state- as long as you can get half of it covered, you really won't find a better deal.
Share any unusual traditions or locations on campus
Most of the building have underground rooms, some are connected to each other- but there are no underground labyrinths to get lost in. Really.
Clubs and Activities
There is almost everything you can imagine. If you are unique in a class of 12,000 or so freshmen and no one is doing your thing, you can even start your own club with a minimum of 10 members or something small like that.
Campus Safety
This is a large, open campus in downtown seattle. Anyone can walk on. However, it is very safe considering, and there is a dedicated police force on campus. Bike theft is common.
Sign in to rate & review