Washington & Jefferson College
Washington, PA, USA

Admissions

Key Admission Stats

Institution Type
Private
  • Coed

Need Blind

This school does not consider an applicant’s financial situation when deciding admission

Level of Institution
4 Year
Campus Setting
Suburb or town
0
100
48%
Acceptance Rate
5,358
Students Applied
31%
Transfer Acceptance Rate
29
Transfer Students Admitted

Admissions Requirements

SAT
No
ACT
No
SAT Subject Tests
Yes
AP Course Credit
Yes
Dual Enrollment
Yes
Transcript
Yes

Important Deadlines

Application Type Application Deadline Reply Deadline
Early Decision Acceptance is binding so student must attend college if accepted. December 1, 2019
Early Action Acceptance is not binding, but student will receive admissions decision earlier. January 15, 2020
Fall Regular Decision March 1, 2019 May 1, 2019
Test Optional
Yes
Application Fee
$25
Fee waivers available
Applications Accepted
Rolling Admissions
No

Admitted Student Stats

In-State Students
72%
Out-Of-State Students
23%
US States Represented
36
Countries Represented
37
25%
Submitting ACT
54%
Submitting SAT
SAT Percentiles

Math
25th
560
75th
660
Reading
25th
570
75th
660
3.70
Average GPA
Students Enrolled By GPA

3.75+
50%
3.50 - 3.74
23%
3.25 - 3.49
10%
3.00 - 3.24
12%
2.50 - 2.99
4%
2.00 - 2.49
1%
Students Enrolled By Class Rank

Top 10%
32
Top 25%
62
Top 50%
89

Admissions Resources

Admissions: visit page
Admissions Email: admissions@washjeff.edu
Admissions Telephone: 724-223-6025
For International Student Services: visit page
For Students with Disabilities: visit page
For Veteran Services: visit page

What Students Are Saying

3.91 Average Rating
1) Start the year out strong and finish strong!
2) Save up money and get plenty of scholarships, books are a lot more than you’d think!
3) If you have a few hours in between classes, take the time to review notes or study!
4)Your Academic Adviser is basically your best friend, don’t be afraid to talk to them/ask them questions.
5) Get to know your peers and make friends! It’s a small school, so chances are you will know nearly everyone within the first few weeks anyways.
6) Go to the Peer-Assisted Learning (PAL) Programs. The teacher’s assistants at the programs are there to help answer questions or clear up a few things you were not able to ask the professor when class was in session.
7) Join a club. In you're interested in it, you'll meet people who are passionate about the same thing you are.
8) If you want to start a club or event, there are plenty of staff and faculty members willingly to help you start it or act stand as support.
9) Don't forget that college is more than just the grades; learn to be well-rounded and pick up an extra curricular activity or job (if you can).
Abrianne from Harrisburg, PA
1) Along the lines of Bang for the buck, apply for scholarships - a lot of them - apply early - apply often.
2) When you get here, make friends with the people on your floor, it's a long year, I'm sure they're pretty cool people.
3) Along with making friends with those on your floor, talk to people. Don't seclude yourself. You start now, you say you'll change later, but you won't. From the beginning be social, you'll make more friends and have a lot more fun that way.
4) Stay focused. There is time for fun and time for work - most of the time. You are in college, not a zoo. The purpose of being here is to prepare you for life, to educate yourself, and get a degree, not to party so much that you don't study and end up failing out.
5) Talk to your professors. Most of them are some of the coolest people you will ever meet. I encourage you to get to know them, because at some point you are going to need guidance, and who better to go to than someone who has been there before, right?
Brandon from Bethel Park, PA
Find friends who like to do what you do on the weekends. If you don't like partying at the frats, your weekend activities will initially drop severely. However, by making friends, you can find things to do and have an excellent time. Be open to things and, even though it can be hard at times, definitely be yourself. I find that it's important to stand out and let people know who you are.
Benjamin from Elizabeth, PA
as a prospective student, make sure to check out the create your own major aspect of the college and really consider the fact that w&j has personable and helpful professors and workers.
Chelsea from Pittsburgh, PA
Make sure you have a financial plan. That is the biggest thing, I would say. It is a great school, but at the same time, there are always great alternatives. Also, visiting the school is important. The campus is small, and I see that as a good thing (especially in PA winters). Getting to and from class is absolutely not a problem and your friends and study buddies are always close. I really like the campus and it is also nice since it is so close to Pittsburgh.
Cassy from Santa Maria, CA
The transition from high school work to college work can be difficult. Be prepared to WORK for your grade. You're going to find that your study habits will have to change. Dive into the many opportunities that W&J has to offer! There are so many activities and clubs to join! You can get more involved and have a say in what goes on, on campus.
Huong from Reading, PA
My tips? Visit and talk to people! Sit in on classes and afterwards talk to the professors. I visited during the fall of my senior year of high school and sat in on an upper level Psychology course. I took the opportunity to speak with the professor and now in my Sophomore year she remembered me and let me into that Psych course which is impossible for sophomores to get into. Also, talk to students on campus when you visit. Ask them what they like and dislike, then see if you can handle the dislikes when making your decision.
Mina from Chicago
Ask a lot of questions about the school so you can get an accurate depiction of each school that you go to. Take a tour of the school and visit a class that you would be interested in. It will help you get the gist of what an average college class would be like.
Ka Ron from Carlisle, PA
Always get your work done ahead of time, do not procrastinate. If you are trying to go premed start studying for exams at least 2 weeks ahead of time; they are hard. If you have an issue with anything about life in your dorm ask Reslife, they can help with a lot of things.
Danielle from Venetia, PA
Come visit: take a tour, stay over night with a current student. Seeing a college first hand really helps you decide if it's right for you. Coming to W&J really solidified my choice to go here.
Lauren from Bellefonte, PA

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