Questions to Ask if You Go Greek

on August 7, 2017

Deciding which fraternity or sorority chapter to rush can be just as difficult as deciding to join Greek life in the first place. Going Greek can be expensive, take up free time and cause unwanted social drama, but many believe in the benefits of having a support system, meeting likeminded individuals and pursuing organized philanthropy outweigh the costs.

 

Here are some questions to ask if you decide to join Greek life:

 

What do I value most?

 

Greek organizations pride themselves on their core values, with some of the most popular being truth, service, friendship and scholarship. When you consider chapters, ask members what makes their organization unique and what common traits members have. If the values don’t correlate with what you believe is most important, rule that chapter out.

 

How much can I commit?

 

Like any college organization, Greek life is a commitment. Chapter meetings, recruitment activities and social events require significant time commitments, and it’s up to you to decide if they’re worth it. If you’re already involved in other time-consuming student groups, joining Greek life likely will leave you with an overbearing and stressful schedule. Calculate how much free time you have before rushing and ask chapters what amount of time each member commits weekly.

 

How much will this cost?

 

Involvement in Greek life isn’t free. You must pay to join a chapter, each term comes with membership dues, social events rarely are free and some organizations require you to live in their house for at least one year. Joining a fraternity or sorority can get expensive, and it’s up to you to decide whether the price of membership is worth it.

 

What is the average member like?

 

You’ll want to be comfortable with the current members of a fraternity or sorority before you join. Asking members what they look for in a potential new member can hint at the sort of individuals who make up the organization. It’s important to listen to outside opinion in case a chapter markets itself as something it isn’t, but don’t forget to ask each Greek organization about the types of students it recruits.

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