University of Houston
Houston, TX, USA

Admissions

Key Admission Stats

Institution Type
Public
  • Coed
  • Hispanic-Serving Institution

Need Blind

This school does not consider an applicant’s financial situation when deciding admission

Level of Institution
4 Year
Campus Setting
Major city
0
100
61%
Acceptance Rate
20,768
Students Applied
91%
Transfer Acceptance Rate
8299
Transfer Students Admitted

Admissions Requirements

SAT
Yes
ACT
Yes
SAT Subject Tests
Yes
AP Course Credit
Yes
Dual Enrollment
Yes
Transcript
Yes

Important Deadlines

Application Type Application Deadline Reply Deadline
Fall Regular Decision June 7, 2020
Spring Regular Decision December 1, 2019
Test Optional
No
Application Fee
$75
Fee waivers available
Rolling Admissions
No

Admitted Student Stats

In-State Students
89%
Out-Of-State Students
2%
US States Represented
51
Countries Represented
100
42%
Submitting ACT
84%
Submitting SAT
Average ACT Composite: 24
0
36
Average SAT Composite: 1202
0
1600
SAT Percentiles

Math
25th
550
75th
640
Reading
25th
560
75th
640
3.80
Average GPA
Students Enrolled By GPA

3.75+
65%
3.50 - 3.74
17%
3.25 - 3.49
9%
3.00 - 3.24
5%
2.50 - 2.99
3%
2.00 - 2.49
1%
Students Enrolled By Class Rank

Top 10%
32
Top 25%
66
Top 50%
89
Students Enrolled By Household Income

< $30k
694
$30k - $48k
479
$48k - $75k
445
$75k - $110k
275
$110k+
455

Admissions Resources

Admissions: visit page
Admissions Email: [email protected]
Admissions Telephone: 713-743-1010
For Students with Disabilities: visit page
For Veteran Services: visit page

What Students Are Saying

3.79 Average Rating
If you're a last minute person like myself, this will have to be your one exception. Getting things done as soon as possible is key to having a good experience at the University of Houston. If you need to get something sorted out with the school, go in person and arrive early (preferably as soon as they open in the morning). Otherwise you'll find yourself in a long line (30min-1hr+).
Spencer from Houston, TX
Apply for admissions, financial aid, and scholarships early because they do run out fast. Read your chapters ahead of class and come to class with questions. Form study groups with hard working people and not just friends. Also, come early if you drive a car because parking runs out pretty fast.
Syeda from Houston, TX
for prospective students, do not overlook the honors college. it provides so much more opportunities. it's like having a small community within a community. you can meet a lot of new people and actually bond with professors. class sizes are smaller, professors know your name, there are a lot more students like you, there are many organizations within the college itself, and it is overall just an amazing experience.
Christopher from Houston, TX
Apply early. Honestly. If you go in for the quick apply in November you find out that day if you are accepted or not. Takes a load off your mind. Take dual credit classes, don't necessarily rely on your AP scores to count. I know a student here who scored 4's or 5's on all 6 of his AP tests and only 3 of them counted towards anything. Dual credit is a lot less stressful and you're pretty much guaranteed college credit. Also I can not stress this enough, but look into this school and your will be department before you make your choice. This is a good idea to apply this to whatever school you are interested in. This could be a great experience for you, or it could be a horrible one. Things to take into consideration: Responsiveness, organization, availability, are the advisers worth their salt, what perks do they give you ex: help with internships, and ect.
Meridith from Houston, TX
time management is the key to succeeding at any college but if you are able to prioritize your study and homework time, it is very easy to have free time to get a job, go out with friends on the weekend, or join clubs to make friends!
Angie
More tips... Well, it's better if you learn some stuff on your own.
Gregory from Houston, TX
Even if you have heard it a million times, reading the chapters before lecture is REALLY helpful. Also no matter how well of an expert you are at cramming the night before an exam it will do you no good if the final exam is cumulative
Rubi from Houston, TX
Rate My Professor is your best friend. Be social and you'll make friends easily, with 200 other people in your class you're bound to meet someone. Don't let the class sizes intimidate you, if you listen and take notes it'll be easy
Roberto from Houston, TX
AP Classes and Dual Credit classes are your best friend. They can help clear out so many of the required classes you have to take, called the CORE classes. Everyone has to take these CORE classes, regardless of major. And you save money as well.

Try to go to as many sporting events as you can, like Football and Basketball. You will be surprised when you go and you start cheering. It is a very fun atmosphere, and a good way to take a break from your hard studying :).

Learn to manage your time and study habits. That was one of the hardest things for me from the transition from Highschool to College. It is VERY different. The amount of time you have to commit is very different, well unless you are a super genius. And don't be afraid to get help if you need it.

And wear red everyday :D. Go COOGS!
Washington from Houston, TX
Apply early for a chance to receive scholarships
Frank from Houston, TX