University of Dallas
Irving, TX, USA

Reviews

University of Dallas
4.14 Average Rating

Jamie from Haltom City, TX

a current student here
3 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
Am learning a lot
My mother told me yesterday that I sounded, collegiate. I credit UD for turning me into a stuttering, pop-culture spewing teenager to someone who can have an intelligent conversation and be taken seriously.
Am enjoying being here
The students and faculty are delightfully odd, and the campus is fun to explore at night.
Bang for the buck
It's ridiculously expensive but so, so worth it. Be prepared to sign up for a lot of scholarships and financial aid, though.
Tips for prospective students
Get ready to study like you've never studied before.
Great for these types of students
If you're the person who would read during lunch or recess instead of socializing, this is the place for you.
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Christine from Spicewood, TX

a current student here
3 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
Am learning a lot
We learn a great deal of material at the University of Dallas, but not only that--we learn thoroughly. Our professors challenge our minds and in doing so make us stronger. We come out of our courses more prepared to face the world in supporting our own arguments and convictions.
Am enjoying being here
This University houses a friendly community of a diversity of students. While we are by fact a private, Roman Catholic institution, many members of other faiths find a home here as well, and we make a tight-knit network of students, faculty, and staff. We have excellent outlets for faith here, but also an amazing array of extracurricular activities. There's always a social event on campus; we study hard, but we like to have our fun as well.
Bang for the buck
With a private institution will always come a more expensive price tag, that almost goes without saying. At the University of Dallas, I find it has been worth the extra effort that's gone forth to fund my education. We receive such a multi-faceted education here with our Core Curriculum, and really benefit from the small class sizes and the excellent, well-versed faculty that the university has on tenure.
Tips for prospective students
If you're looking at the University of Dallas, ask yourself if you want the well-rounded, quality education you'll find here. If you want to learn how to support your own claims and develop valuable writing, rhetorical, and problem-solving skills, this could be the college you've been searching for.
Great for these types of students
The University of Dallas has exemplary academic departments and faculties for any student looking to study in the areas of English literature, history, philosophy, art, politics, theology, classics, modern languages, drama, economics, education, and psychology. Our science departments of physics, chemistry, and biology are beneficial for students pursuing careers in those areas; for these and all of our students, the University requires completion of a Core Curriculum, which includes a sampling of nearly every subject we have to offer. For example, if a student is a biology major who has a great interest in a liberal arts field, he or she will be able to enjoy courses in that field alongside their biology curriculum.
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Brendan from San Juan Capistrano, CA

a current student here
2 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
In three sentences
UD is a wonderful place to be, from the people you meet walking around campus on a daily basis, to the wide range of diverse professors who genuinely want you to excel and teach the subjects they've loved since their college years, to the rich faith life and the tolerant atmosphere. I have found people of many, polar opposite beliefs, at UD, and have found them to be wonderful people who are willing to challenge their own beliefs and challenge my own, and to be loving about it. Of course there are close-minded people, as at any conservative or liberal university, but at UD, people come first-- many dogmatic and philosophical beliefs are tolerated, but intellectual laziness or close-mindedness is not.
Tips for prospective students
You will be academically, intellectually, spiritually and morally challenged at the University of Dallas-- but only if you are open to it. There are some Catholic students at UD who could be labelled close-minded or prudish, and some students on the opposite end of the spectrum, but the sheer number of genuine and good people who are trying to live their lives to the fullest is the reason I love being here-- as a prospie, be aware that you will be challenged, and embrace that challenge wholeheartedly, with prayer if you are a person of faith, and get ready to have a life-changing four years.

Also, get a good joke ready to submit along with your application materials.
Academic Rigor
As a Biology/English double major with a concentration in Pre-Health studies, I can say that the English department at UD is unparalleled. Most of its professors come from the Ivy Leagues, and the ones who do not are equal in caliber.

If you are coming for English studies, you will find it hard attempting to master the Greek, Roman, and Old English epics, along with Dante's Commedia and Milton's Paradise Lost (don't worry, it's technically impossible), but will especially love the upper-level classes. That's when I really started to develop a love for the curriculum.

All the humanities-- philosophy, theology, English, etc.-- are taught by solid, rigorous professors across the board. Lots of reading, but work hard and you'll get into the swing of it relatively quickly.

The sciences:

The Biology department is solid. Dr. Doe has connections at literally every medical school in Texas; Dr. Cody is an amazing scientist and a solid teacher; among others the newcomer Dr. Phillips is an excellent teacher and fair grader. Very rigorous, but an excellently broad and deep knowledge of biology is to be had here.

The Physics department is also solid; Dr. Moldenhauer and Dr. Sally Hicks, not to mention a plethora of others I just haven't taken are all excellent and are open to being bothered about difficult problems for hours every day. I would sit in Moldenhauer's office for about 6 hours a week asking him about concepts for my Gen Phys class.

Similar comments for the Chemistry department. They are all solid, excellent professors who have been here for many years, and will make sure you walk away with a highly in-depth knowledge of their subject. Very hard work for me, but all the chemistry I've taken here (O'Hara program, Organic Chem) is all extremely rewarding and will be very useful in my career.

Last note: All the professors (or almost all) are extremely available to their students, both in class and out of it. They are required to have office hours...
Dorm Life
Pretty standard freshmen dorms, divided into guys and girls dorms. There are slightly more girls than guys at the university (I think it's a 60/40 split), so there is one more girl dorm for freshmen. The girls dorms are nice, from what I've seen of them. The guys dorms are good, but sometimes they dip down to acceptable. I think the state of the dorm for freshmen depends on the people living in it. Great and approachable RAs, especially right now. The Office of Student Life is one of the friendliest and is really looking out for the students in the dorms.

As a sophomore you can move into New Hall (which has been renamed West Hall because, and I quote, We can't just keep calling it New Hall), which is much nicer, easier to keep clean, and includes your own sink and a nice living area in suites (single, double, triple, and a few quads). Floors are divided by sex-- girls on 1st and 3rd floors, guys on 2nd and 4th.

As a junior or senior you can move into the student apartments, the condos, or Old Mill, all of which are solid apartments and relatively cheap.

In general, dorm life is vibrant, friendly, and fun, and fosters a good atmosphere for jolly comraderie. For girls I don't know, but I'm sure it's wonderful. The RAs are always very on-top of things, as is the maintenance staff in each dorm, so even if a foul odor is emitting from the room next to you it won't be there long if you talk to your RA. Of course, this all depends on how you contribute to dorm life, and the people you are living with. Try to feel it out, depending on your personality and tastes, what dorm is best for you. Generally the OSL places students in dorms that work well for them; if you don't like your dorm after a semester, you can transfer to another one without a problem.
Food and Dining
The cafeteria is catered by Aramark, which has a generally very solid staff. Most of them are very nice people, and the food is very healthy. Salads and sandwiches always available, and the full grill is almost always available. Interesting desserts (too interesting, I would say sometimes), soy and dairy milk options, pretty much anything you would want out of a cafeteria. Vegetarian options are always available; vegan options are available upon request. You'll hear a lot of complaining about the state of the cafeteria, and complain a lot yourself, but I think that's the nature of college cafeterias.
Downstairs is the Rathskellar (which we unfortunately have nicknamed The Rat, where high-quality grill and pizza options are available, as well as regular items for purchase. Generally you purchase the 7-meal plan or the all-access plan at the beginning of the semester, both of which come with a preloaded declining balance account with which to purchase food at the Rat. I'm on the 7-meal plan, which comes with much more money on that declining balance account so that you can eat one meal a day in the cafeteria, one in the Rat for 14 meals a week. I usually make breakfast in my dorm, so it works well for me and saves me over a a thousand bucks. If I have any advice for food and dining, it would be to buy cereal and milk and oatmeal and make your own breakfast in your room, then eat lunch and dinner at the two main dining options.
Last thing-- the Capp Bar. Great, cheap coffee made at a full Italian press. Pastries and whatnot are available, and all your friends will be working there, if you aren't. It's a really fun student worker position if you're looking for one, as are the Business and Admissions offices.
What to do for fun
I am attempting to double-major, so I'm probably the wrong person to ask, but I would say the best things to do are:
1. Get involved in what you're interested in-- clubs, sports, drama, music, societies, etc. Things to do will follow.
2. Talk to people around campus. Actually, just say hi to everyone because you'll pass them 3 times a day and after a while it'll just start to get awkward. It's a close-knit community we have at UD.
3. You have a DART pass on your student ID, and we have our own stop a 5 minute walk from the dorms. The DART can get you into downtown Dallas in 20 minutes, where you can get food, dancing, movies, anything you could want. Dallas is a rapidly expanding city, and we are right on the fringes of it.
Bang for the buck
I wouldn't trade my experience at UD over the past three years for the world. The cost is higher than I'd like personally, but I don't even consider it when I think about the value of my experience and education here
Share any unusual traditions or locations on campus
Every Friday night, there is a group of people who go into the woods and play traditional Irish music around a fire. It's been a tradition for some years, and it's always fun. It's a little hard to find, but ask around and you'll find someone who's been there or plays at it. Go and listen and hang out, and sing along if you know the words.
Great for these types of students
Fun-loving, bibliophilic, serious about their faith and/or career goals, are ready to be intellectually challenged. If you hate humanities and simply will not tolerate having to read tracts on philosophy, theology, and more, this is not the school for you. That being said, you don't have to love reading extended philosophical tracts, just be open to doing lots of humanities work. If you are open to the experience, UD and your fellow students will challenge and humble you in every way, but with love. If you are pursuing a technical/science degree, know that you will get an excellent education in the sciences, but you will be intellectually developed as a person by your humanities classes. UD's students as a whole are extremely tolerant of many viewpoints, but be aware that it is a generally conservative Catholic university, so if you get thrown in Charity Week jail you may have to request that your bail money goes towards a non-pro-life charity and things like that.
Clubs and Activities
If the club or activity you want doesn't exist, make it happen! We have a sailing club, a swimming club, various Greek honors societies, a huge variety of recreation and sport clubs as well as academic clubs. Club activities are a big part of UD culture. Student Government, SPUD and the Student Foundations all put on tons of activities throughout the year, all of which you can be involved in or take part in. One of my favorite activities is the monthly Cap House performance, which is always performed by one of our own students and generally consists of covers and original pieces. Guitar and vocal is most common, but piano, cello, violin, and harmonica have all been featured instruments at Cap House performances.
Greek Life
No Greek life. We took a vote on having a fraternity last year, and I think generally we decided that it would be awkward if half the guys at UD were in Greek life, and the other half weren't. I think the campus is just too small for it. But a lot of students are open to having it, so things could change.
Campus Safety
Our CSO is fantastic. Always on duty, always handles things well. Officer Tod Walker is a former army medic and civilian paramedic, and the other officers have similar track records of service. All guys who have devoted their lives to protect and serve, and are occasionally slow to let you into your dorm at 3 in the morning if you've lost your key, but I can't blame them for that. UD's campus is an extremely safe one, thanks to our officers.
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Amir from Dallas, TX

accepted here and planning to attend soon
2 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
In three sentences
Honestly I have yet to attend, but the impression that's been given is pretty clear how humbling the school is. There's a huge regard towards the deep thoughts of knowledge and how far an individual can go by becoming the independent thinker. I find it welcoming, with a warm environment.
Tips for prospective students
Really find your path with what you feel you NEED to know. There's a huge difference between someone who is attending a university, and someone who is thirsty for doing what they want to do and learning what they want to learn. Ultimately have the sense of urgency to learn if you're willing to make the commitment to this school, it is unlike any other I've seen before.
Academic Rigor
It is a huge commitment, and overall the course work will involve a lot of your time. From what I am finding out about my reading list and what's ahead for me: To make the grade, this isn't just some ordinary English course. It is vivid work, that involves you to be very meticulous. You're going to read everything form the Bible to the Iliad. You will grow as a student, there's no way you can ignore the work that's been put in.
Dorm Life
I will say from what I've heard the dorm life is special. Everybody enjoys the campus as much as they enjoy the dorms. Lots of mobility, and very welcoming settings in the community of The University of Dallas.
Food and Dining
Buffet all day! I've seen the menu and I'm already hungry. The meal plan provides a thorough and reasonable amount of food. They've got you covered from breakfast, lunch and dinner! The menu is open to bacon, pancakes, eggs, burgers, fries, fried chicken, YOU NAME IT! It's all good here!
What to do for fun
It may come to a surprise, but with the academic rigor and the student life (besides sports) a lot of what's fun is what's being learned on campus. Again this isn't your ordinary campus. Here everybody wants to learn and grow more! As humans we have our interactions and fun, downtown Dallas is ten miles away. Fortunately, the knowledge and real education sits right there for us to enjoy and savor.
Bang for the buck
It is a private university, so there's no surprise this type of education is going to cost a little more. But with the financial assistance you get, and the vast array of scholarships available it is very affordable. Plus there's always scholarship opportunities all over campus.
Great for these types of students
People who want to learn and grow as human beings. It's that simple, there is no real hidden agenda here. Either you want it or you don't. Realistically the material and the courses given needs to be given everywhere. It's the type of work that begins to hinder inside of an individual and begin to ask all of the real questions about life.
Clubs and Activities
There isn't any reason for you not to be busy on campus! There's plenty going on! From sports to theater! The University of Dallas provides an extended amount of extracurricular opportunities.
Campus Safety
I always feel secure on campus no matter what day of the week it is. The campus police department is no joke and looks after it's students.
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Amanda from Clint, TX

a current student here
12 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
Am learning a lot
This University is definitely a challenge. You will learn to make connections between two or more subjects you're studying simultaneously, and can therefore more easily apply your knowledge to everyday life and your future career...UD is big on the classics: Aristotle, Plato, Homer, Virgil...you'll read, and enjoy, them all. Your brain may hurt at the end of every day, but, no pain, no gain, right?
Am enjoying being here
The University of Dallas is fun! The campus is often described as a bubble, because, while living on campus, the rest of the world sort of fades away. You study at school, live at school, eat at school, socialize at school. Downtown Dallas is maybe five minutes away, in case you have to get out every once in awhile, but chances are, you'll love UD so much that you'll hardly want to! Look forward to Charity Week, Battle of the Bands, Groundhog, and Winter Cotillion. Also, sophomores at UD spend an entire semester abroad at UD's campus in Rome, Italy.
Bang for the buck
It's expensive. NO kidding. Do your best in high school so that UD will offer you as much financial aid as they see fit. Apply for private scholarships as well. Expect to take out at least one student loan...this school is worth the expense, so there's no harm in applying to see where you stand.
Tips for prospective students
Expect to write numerous papers per class, and no fluffing allowed! Every professor at UD knows exactly what they're talking about, so they'll know if you don't. Read the material and you'll do fine. No matter how smart you were in highschool, you will fumble a few times your freshman year. UD profs grade hard. Just learn to adjust to what they expect of you, and you'll get back on track.
Great for these types of students
Religious! Esp. Catholic. If you're serious about your faith, you will grow in it to the max at UD. The university also has a very high percentage of Republicans/Conservatives.
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Olivia

a current student here
9 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
Academic Rigor
UD professors really challenge students to think about things, develop their own arguments, and make connections with what they’re learning in one class to what they’ve learned in another. This dynamic is facilitated by the Core Curriculum – every UD student is required to take specific History, English, and Philosophy classes, in addition to politics, art, and economics. Admittedly, some professors are easier than others, and you can manage the difficulty of your classes by asking around for who is and isn’t a hard teacher. That being said, I would highly recommend taking the hard teachers (Moran for Lit Trad is wonderful); they really make the UD experience special. Dr. Olenick in Physics and Dr. Hendrickson in Chemistry are especially noteworthy as exceptional professors for those interested in the sciences. Overall, I am very happy with the education I am earning at UD!
Am enjoying being here
It may sound cliché, but I am having the time of my life at UD. The friends I’ve made are the best I’ve ever had. UD students are not afraid to be who they are and do what they want to do. For some, it means having hours long conversations about Plato and Aristotle; for others, it means spending every spare minute in the Drama department; and for one of my friends, it means walking around in a banana suit on special occasions (I’m not kidding – everyone loves it!). In addition, there’s always something to do on campus. RHA has multiple events each week, Swing Club has dancing from 9-11 every Wednesday night, SPUD puts on TGIT, Dallas Year organizes weekend activities off campus (anywhere from a fancy dinner to Six Flags to a baseball game), and the many clubs on campus have plenty of events throughout each month. UD also offers some very much beloved traditions throughout the year, including Charity Week (watch out – you might get jailed!), Lazy Faire (the snow cones and water slides are refreshing, to say the least), Winter Cotillion (all ballroom dancing – it’s fantastic!), Groundhog (only recommended for those who like to drink), and Spring Formal (more modern than Cotillion and usually located at an off-campus venue). Sometimes, though, watching a movie in the dorm with your friends, playing a board game, or getting off campus to see the city is more appealing. There’s even a 50 cent movie theatre near campus. There’s hardly ever a lack of things to do on or off campus, nor friends with whom to enjoy them!
Bang for the buck
UD is very expensive compared to public schools, but compared to other Catholic schools, its tuition is normal. Most students do receive a large amount of financial aid, and there are many merit-based scholarships for students who are willing to work hard. National Merit Finalists receive full tuition! Work study is also readily available for low income students.

The education and the atmosphere is definitely worth the money. UD is not very well funded, however, and all of the departments recently received budget cuts. There isn't a lot of money to go around for clubs and student government, but it is enough to keep the students happy. The cafeteria is not worth cost, but the comaraderie with other students is nice. The dorms are not as nice as they could be, and sometimes things take a little while to get fixed, but overall they are still pleasant places to be.

I think UD is worth the money, but if you would have to take so many loans that you're paying them off well into your 40's, it may be wiser to attend a different school.
Tips for prospective students
If you're a prospective student, the best thing you can do is visit the campus. It's what convinced me to attend UD, and I know many other students who had a similar experience.

If you do attend UD, then

DO:
- Go to Rome. UD has a campus in Due Santi (just outside Rome), and students often attend school in Italy for an entire semester during the Sophomore or Junior year. More information about the program can be found here: http://www.udallas.edu/aboutus/offices/advancement/giving/givingopportunities/rome

- Visit Campus Ministry. The people there are the most quirky/interesting/goodhearted people you will meet, and Denise Phillips, the Campus Minister, is a wonderful help if you just need to talk to someone. You’ll also find out about volunteer opportunities more easily, if you’re interested. If you’re not Catholic, it’s not a problem – Campus Ministry exists to minister to the non-Catholics on campus, although Catholics are welcome too.

- Go to Open Anselm on Wednesday nights – it’s free food and a movie, but you don’t have to stay for the movie. Did I mention there was free food? Well, there is. Free food. Don’t miss it.

- Try swing dancing. It’s very popular at UD, and it’s not hard to learn.

- Get to know your professors. Many of the professors at UD love nothing more than for you to walk into their office for a friendly visit!

- Bring a printer. UD has a computer lab if you need to print, but it’s cheaper and easier to use your own if you can. Also, the healthy bacterial cultures which live on the computer mice are rather disturbing (I know, because I tested them myself).

DON’T:

- Climb on top of the art building roof. It’s an easy climb, so many students are tempted to do it, but campus safety officers check for students there regularly, and if you’re caught, you’ll be fined a few hundred dollars. It’s not worth it, especially since the Dallas pollution prevents you from seeing many stars.

- ...
Great for these types of students
UD embraces many different types of students, but most share a love of learning. If you are
- curious
- want to learn about more than just your major through the Core Curriculum
- want to spend a semester abroad in Italy
- are a Catholic looking for a supportive, moral environment
- want a small school with small class sizes
- love a good challenge,

then you should definitely consider the University of Dallas.

UD has very strong Biology, Theology, and Philosophy programs, and is a good choice for those who would like to go on to law or medical school. It’s also a very good place for science majors who want a liberal arts education while still learning the technical information required by their chosen field.
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Kim from Arlington, TX

a current student here
4 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
In three sentences
UD is an extremely challenging university that will push you harder than you have ever been pushed. You will meet wonderful people and professors at this institution that will change your mentality and who you are as a person, as well as making great memories. Anyone who can tough it out here can survive anywhere in the real world.
Tips for prospective students
Coming into UD I was a bright eyed, bushy tail 18 year old who graduated with top honors, a near impeccable GPA and high SAT scores. However, my first semester was tumultuous because albeit I dedicated hours to my study, it wasn't the right kind of studying--I would get easily distracted by the novelty of college life and seeing my friends, late nights watching netflix in my dorm room. Projects and tests would be studied for overnight and I was simply overwhelmed: I did not prepare myself fully for the workload of UD. Yes, I had been in honors and AP courses, but at UD, it's always a struggle no matter how many classes you have taken in preparation for college life. Learn to study better, and utilize quality study areas such as the third floor of the library, the empty rooms in gorman, and the science building's vastness.
Academic Rigor
As previously stated, be motivated. Especially if you're a science major--you need to work to stay here. UD will challenge you and propel you to pull all nighters and shed tears and sweat.
Dorm Life
Freshman dorms are small and a bit rundown, but the quality of student life is sublime. Living in the new dorm when you're a sophomore and apartments when you're an upperclassman will make up for freshman year.
Food and Dining
One cafeteria and one fast food dining hall with endless buffet options. There is always something to eat.
What to do for fun
UD hosts tons of school sponsored events and campus is lively during the day. Music is played on the mall, and frequent trips to Dallas are sponsored as well.
Bang for the buck
Extremely pricey but UD gives out good scholarships and it's an investment towards your future. Make sure to keep up that GPA.
Share any unusual traditions or locations on campus
Groundhog park. You'll know what it is when you get here.
Tower lights up blue for Alumni events, which are fun.
Great for these types of students
Pre-med, Catholic, Business Majors.
Greek Life
NO GREEK LIFE. But the dorms are so small it's like being in sororities and fraternities anyways.
Campus Safety
I feel so safe walking around campus even at 4 in the morning. Always security officers walking around.
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Kathleen from Sykesville, MD

a current student here
4 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
Am learning a lot
I am a freshman here at UD and am enjoying all my classes immensely. Each professor expects you to do your best and won't cut you slack, but they also are willing to listen to you if you have a problem or have a question.
Am enjoying being here
Honestly when I first arrived for freshman orientation I was concerned about finding a really good group of friends. I shouldn't have been concerned! The people here are great and very friendly.
After being here for a couple months and living through Charity week and going to the weekly music at TGIT, I can testify that there are so many opportunities to do things on and off campus. In my hall we have biweekly movie nights where we just relax and get to know each other better. I never thought college could be this much fun!
Bang for the buck
Most colleges are very expensive and UD is no exception, but like several other reviewers said: do really well in high school so you will qualify for scholarships. After talking to many people, a lot of us are here on generous scholarships. The quality education you receive here is worth the cost though. It is very rare to find a school that across the board uses original texts for the classes. You don't learn history from a text book, you read John Adams, Herodotus etc. I would recommend UD to anybody who wants to really learn.
Tips for prospective students
Do your best and remember that knowledge is better than book smart. I would also recommend applying at the Early Application deadline in November so that you have a better chance at scholarships and acceptance.
Great for these types of students
I chose to come to UD because of the Catholic identity and the liberal arts education and many of my fellow freshman came for the same reasons.
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MC from NY

a current student here
4 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
Am learning a lot
The classes are both challenging and rewarding. The workload can be intense depending on what classes and professors you have, but if you enjoy learning and actually want to get something out of the college experience, you will definitely get it here.
Am enjoying being here
The students and faculty are very welcoming. Unfortunately, there's not much around the campus, so the only way to get out into Dallas or just off campus in general is by car. This can be somewhat good - because you and your classmates have to create your own entertainment quite a lot of the time, but there lots of RHA and club events that you could attend as well, so as not to sit bored in your room all day.
Bang for the buck
This was by far the cheapest Catholic university out of all the ones I applied to. The financial aid was very generous and definitely much more than what I was offered at similar, or even worse, Catholic and/or private institutions.
Tips for prospective students
Get good grades! Your best bet at coming here and not having to pay too much is by getting the academic scholarships. Also, learn to enjoy reading. You will read in pretty much every class here - and not just books based off of first sources, you read the original texts of Plato, Aristotle, Homer, etc. It is somewhat daunting, but if you're a good reader it's definitely manageable.
Great for these types of students
Catholic thinkers, people that want a real liberal arts education, and those who want to study theology or any humanities. UD is not well known for its math and science programs - and probably rightly so - it's known for the humanities and having a good Core; so people seriously interested in math or science might want to look elsewhere, unless they really want the Core Curriculum.
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Jerick from Arlington, TX

accepted here and planning to attend soon
3 people found this review useful
Categories Comments
Will learn a lot
You will learn a whole lot when you get there. The school is academically based on the classics and philosophy so if you can't already tell you'll be having a great time!
Will enjoy being here
I will always enjoy being there. I always have so much fun when I have visited the campus.
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